College-News

Rough Trade Visit

Rough Trade Visit

Students Rough It With Record Company Legend Geoff Travis

Record company legend Geoff Travis stopped by Kensington and Chelsea College recently to give students an exclusive insight in to life in the music industry.

Lucky students on the Digital Musicians course spent two hours quizzing Geoff about his life and career as founder of independent music record label Rough Trade and chain of Rough Trade record shops.

The music marvel was an instant hit with his audience as he spoke about his achievements, before dispensing with invaluable advice about starting out in the music industry.

Speaking at the college’s Wornington Centre Geoff said: ‘I have a real love for music and in my earlier years worked around music for very little pay. The best way to get in to the industry is to try and become an intern somewhere, and when you do get an intern role be good at it, be enthusiastic and when asked to do something do it well. If you work hard, have ideas and good communications skills, and love what you do you stand a good chance of getting where you want.’

Kheron G, who is studying on the digital Musicians course, added: ‘Meeting someone with as much experience and connections as Geoff has in the music industry was a real opportunity for us as students. Everyone was keen to ask him lots of questions and wanted to make the most of having him there.’

Since setting up the renowned Rough Trade label in West London in 1978 Geoff has gone on to sign some of the UK’s most recognisable artists including Jarvis Cocker, Morrissey, The Smiths and The Libertines.

Geoff added: ‘Music has always been a big part of my life from a young age. I remember as I was growing up all my money went on buying records. The business came about because I wanted to find away of always being around music and making work my play.’

The event was organised music tutor Benjamin James Smith, who said: ‘The students really engaged with Geoff. He was a great source of inspiration and gave students a realistic outlook of the music industry.’